CHANNILLO

Welcome to Channillo!

Already have an account? Log In













*Memberships start at $4.99/month and let you to subscribe to series.

By signing up you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

Maybe Later

Chicago Kids
By L. R. Moore

Series Description:

On the tumultuous streets of a Chicago neighborhood during the 70's, a group of unsupervised tweens confront puberty, predators, hardships, and death.

Inspired by true events.

The first set of shorts is titled Any Given Day 1975 And the Deconstruction of Victor Brown. Individual tales depict what our group of city kids were up against on any given day. Strung through each storyline is a subplot that explores the disappearance of Vic. It’s inspired by one of the kids in our circle who vanished for two weeks.

The end of one story bleeds into the beginning of the next, eventually forming a larger picture.

Edited by: EditAlley.com

About the Cover: Top Photo: As a kid growing up on Chicago's northeast side, most of my childhood was spent at the lakefront. Pleased to be granted permission to use this 1975 vintage picture of one of my favorite old haunts.

Credit: Jack Bradley Photojournalism Collection, Special Collections Center, Bradley University Library.

Category: Short Stories
Updated: Monthly
Status: Inactive



Author Bio For L. R. Moore:

L. R. Moore is a pseudonym for Author Lorelei Buckley, who under her own name writes paranormal romance described by Publishers Weekly as "pulse-pounding."

From a young age, L. R. Moore has had an incredibly textured life, and Channillo provided a unique platform to share glimpses of those early run-free-with (and from)-the-wolves days in Chi-Town.

Currently, she lives in Texas with her husband and a menagerie of rescue animals. In her spare time she enjoys researching genealogy, an occasional glass of red wine, and losing herself in a great book.

Represented by Night Edge Publishing, Chicago Kids will eventually be released in digital and paperback formats.

Notes:

Chicago Kids, Copyright 2016, Night Edge Publishing

While the stories are inspired by true events, names and timelines have been changed. Chicago Kids is not a memoir. 







Series Description:

On the tumultuous streets of a Chicago neighborhood during the 70's, a group of unsupervised tweens confront puberty, predators, hardships, and death.

Inspired by true events.

The first set of shorts is titled Any Given Day 1975 And the Deconstruction of Victor Brown. Individual tales depict what our group of city kids were up against on any given day. Strung through each storyline is a subplot that explores the disappearance of Vic. It’s inspired by one of the kids in our circle who vanished for two weeks.

The end of one story bleeds into the beginning of the next, eventually forming a larger picture.

Edited by: EditAlley.com

About the Cover: Top Photo: As a kid growing up on Chicago's northeast side, most of my childhood was spent at the lakefront. Pleased to be granted permission to use this 1975 vintage picture of one of my favorite old haunts.

Credit: Jack Bradley Photojournalism Collection, Special Collections Center, Bradley University Library.

Category: Short Stories
Updated: Monthly
Status: Inactive


Author Bio For L. R. Moore:

L. R. Moore is a pseudonym for Author Lorelei Buckley, who under her own name writes paranormal romance described by Publishers Weekly as "pulse-pounding."

From a young age, L. R. Moore has had an incredibly textured life, and Channillo provided a unique platform to share glimpses of those early run-free-with (and from)-the-wolves days in Chi-Town.

Currently, she lives in Texas with her husband and a menagerie of rescue animals. In her spare time she enjoys researching genealogy, an occasional glass of red wine, and losing herself in a great book.

Represented by Night Edge Publishing, Chicago Kids will eventually be released in digital and paperback formats.

Notes:

Chicago Kids, Copyright 2016, Night Edge Publishing

While the stories are inspired by true events, names and timelines have been changed. Chicago Kids is not a memoir.