CHANNILLO
Unfixed Timelines 2
By Dawn Vogel

Series Description:

A Russian pilot using a bit of magic and music to rescue her compatriot. The family impacts of a crossroads deal unfulfilled. Ethnographic observations and misinterpretations. A magical organization devoted to stopping demons. A Victorian-era prostitute takes on Jack the Ripper. Children mailed to a strange fairy tale land. And an unusual pairing of European nobility that spans the centuries. In this second volume of truths stranger than fiction, you'll find six stories and a poem in which history and fiction are blended together. Each piece is accompanied by a brief essay detailing the history that the story or poem twists.

Category/Genre(s): Short Stories, Historical Fiction, Essays/Columns, Fantasy
Updated: Weekly
Status: Ongoing



Author Bio For Dawn Vogel:

Dawn Vogel’s academic background is in history, so it’s not surprising that much of her fiction is set in earlier times. By day, she edits reports for historians and archaeologists. In her alleged spare time, she runs a craft business, co-runs a small press, and tries to find time for writing. Her steampunk adventure series, Brass and Glass, is available from DefCon One Publishing. She is a member of Broad Universe, SFWA, and Codex Writers. She lives in Seattle with her awesome husband (and fellow author), Jeremy Zimmerman, and their herd of cats.

Notes:

When I set out to put together the second volume of my alternate history and fantastical history stories, I hoped to do much as I had for the first volume--spend a day in the local libraries to do my research for the accompanying essays.

The weekends I had scheduled for the research were in March 2020, and as COVID-19 swept into Washington state, I realized that my research plans would not come to fruition. The libraries closed, leaving me to do my research on the internet.

As a result, the essays are not as rigorously researched as I would have liked. I made use of books I had on hand, books I could access through Google, and internet articles. My citations are heavily reliant upon Wikipedia. But I've also included some information about other sources of interest, the very books I might have tried to access if I could have used the libraries.

In the end, the essays still convey a bit of the history behind my stories, which is their ultimate purpose. I hope my readers can forgive that they are less academic than I had hoped.







Series Description:

A Russian pilot using a bit of magic and music to rescue her compatriot. The family impacts of a crossroads deal unfulfilled. Ethnographic observations and misinterpretations. A magical organization devoted to stopping demons. A Victorian-era prostitute takes on Jack the Ripper. Children mailed to a strange fairy tale land. And an unusual pairing of European nobility that spans the centuries. In this second volume of truths stranger than fiction, you'll find six stories and a poem in which history and fiction are blended together. Each piece is accompanied by a brief essay detailing the history that the story or poem twists.

Category/Genre(s): Short Stories, Historical Fiction, Essays/Columns, Fantasy
Updated: Weekly
Status: Ongoing


Author Bio For Dawn Vogel:

Dawn Vogel’s academic background is in history, so it’s not surprising that much of her fiction is set in earlier times. By day, she edits reports for historians and archaeologists. In her alleged spare time, she runs a craft business, co-runs a small press, and tries to find time for writing. Her steampunk adventure series, Brass and Glass, is available from DefCon One Publishing. She is a member of Broad Universe, SFWA, and Codex Writers. She lives in Seattle with her awesome husband (and fellow author), Jeremy Zimmerman, and their herd of cats.

Notes:

When I set out to put together the second volume of my alternate history and fantastical history stories, I hoped to do much as I had for the first volume--spend a day in the local libraries to do my research for the accompanying essays.

The weekends I had scheduled for the research were in March 2020, and as COVID-19 swept into Washington state, I realized that my research plans would not come to fruition. The libraries closed, leaving me to do my research on the internet.

As a result, the essays are not as rigorously researched as I would have liked. I made use of books I had on hand, books I could access through Google, and internet articles. My citations are heavily reliant upon Wikipedia. But I've also included some information about other sources of interest, the very books I might have tried to access if I could have used the libraries.

In the end, the essays still convey a bit of the history behind my stories, which is their ultimate purpose. I hope my readers can forgive that they are less academic than I had hoped.