CHANNILLO
Haunted America
By Verona Jones

Series Description:

Alabama's Sloss Furnace

I love things that go bump in the night. Haunted locations complete with paranormal happenings. I'm currently working on a weekly series about America's Cryptids. 

This series will be one about Haunted America. I'm starting this series off with an Alabama haunted story.

One of the most documented haunted locations in Alabama is Sloss Furnace. Investigated numerous times, Sloss Furnace is a lode of paranormal activity.

Jones Valley, Alabama, has rich resources. The primary resource is the ability to make Iron. All the ingredients were in a 30-mile radius and a rich ore inside the Red Mountain. Hidden in the rich Alabama earth is coal deposits, while limestone, dolomite, and clay. 

 Colonel James Withers Sloss helped create Birmingham in 1876. Along with other business people's help, built Sloss furnace to take advantage of Jones Valley's rich mineral resources. 

From 1882 to 1971, Sloss Furnaces transformed the raw minerals into hardened steel. Steel that was part of the industrial revolution and went into creating New York. The tall skyscraper's that glisten like diamonds in the evening light. 

Sloss furnace grew and prospered during World War II. Its steel went into building ships and tanks supporting the war effort. 

So, why is the Sloss Furnace haunted? 

Stories tell of a foreman, James “Slag” Wormwood. In the early 1900s, Wormwood was foreman of the “Graveyard Shift." That time between sunset and sunrise. He had a crew of 150 workers he forced to keep the Furnace running.

Wormwood was a cruel boss. Alabama's summers are hot and humid, with temperatures soaring to more than 120 degrees. Intense stifling heat, lack of sleep, and poor working conditions made working in the Furnace Hell.

The furnace workers were undocumented immigrants looking for a better way of life. Instead, they found themselves working in unbearable conditions. The fierce heat and cramped quarters, creating intolerable conditions. The workers had only a moment's notice before Wormwood could force them back to work. 

Wormwood forced his poor workers to take dangerous risks to increase production. The time of his leadership, Wormwood lost 47 men. He had ten times more deaths than any other shift at the Furnace. Not only did Wormwood have more deaths on his shift? He also had more accidents. There was even an explosion at the Furnace in which six workers lost their sight.

These poor people had time off - not even the holidays. They had only the Furnace with its back-breaking work.

In October of 1906, Wormwood fell into a pool of melted iron ore. He instantly melted into nothingness. Rumor is that Wormwood slipped from the top of Big Alice. The top of the highest furnace blast at Sloss furnace. There are a few others that believed that the abused workers finally had enough. If the workers did kill Wormwood, there were no charges against them.

Soon after the 'accident,' strange happenings began at the Furnace. Steel production began to drop on that shift, and they stopped the GraveYard shift. It didn't help that the already over-worked men had accidents. They even reported strange and unusual occurrences happening at the Furnace.

News of Sloss Furnace being haunted increased. Workers claimed that they 'felt' his unnatural presence. A night watchman reported an angry voice ordered him back to work. He was pushed from behind resulting in serious injuries.

In 1947, three supervisors went missing. After an extensive search, the three men were found unconscious. They didn't remember much of the attack. Only that a badly burned man approached them and shouted at them “to push some steel.”

The most terrifying incident happened right before the plant closed permanently. They were locking all the secrets and abuse suffered inside behind steel doors. The last night, Samuel Blumenthal, a Sloss Night Watchman, took one last look around. He discovered memories, but not about the plant.

Turning around to leave, he found himself face to face with a “half-man/half-demon.” The creature tried to push him up the stairs, and Blumenthal fought him. The monster, not liking Blumenthal's response, beat him up. Dr. Jack Barlo examined Blumenthal after his horrifying night. Intense burns covered his body, and he died to never return to Sloss.

Since the Furnace's closer in 1971, there have been over 100 reports of paranormal happenings. Anywhere from steam whistles blowing to the rare physical attacks. The majority of the stories are in September and October at night. During the graveyard shift. Coincidence?

September and October immediately bring to mind Halloween pranks. Yet, over 100 reports in thirty years are a lot for mere tricks. 

The history of the Sloss furnace and the unusual paranormal activity gained the attention of investigators. Numerous paranormal investigators wanted a chance to see if the Furnace was haunted.

In 1988, the Center for Paranormal Events (CPE) in St. Petersburg, Florida, investigated Sloss Furnaces. There was no paranormal evidence gathered during the investigation. However, team members felt that the lack of humanity shown to his workers left behind numerous restless souls.

Sloss was investigated again by Fox’s Scariest Places. Their paranormal team stated the site had the highest level of metaphysical energy ever encountered. 

The CBS Affiliate WJTV investigated the site, and this time they captured investigation footage. The Alabama Foundation for Paranormal Research stated they doubted that Sloss is a hotspot of paranormal activity.  

Then on October 4, 2003, a worker from Sloss, Josh Thomas, was assaulted. It was reported Thomas caught fire after seeing a strange figure. Thomas suffered burns up and down his body, but he couldn't remember what happened.

Two psychic investigators from the TV show AIRLINE, Investigated Sloss Furnaces. During the filming, an investigator bled from a cut on his right hand. The camera filmed images of spirits on their cameras. 

The Unexplained Mystery investigation team investigated Sloss. The team captured shadows on film. In 2012, Ghost Adventures-visited, and members were physically assaulted — again, caught on film.

An investigative team from TAPS (Ghost Hunters) visited Sloss Furnace. They captured terrific footage. That evidence, plus the evidence from other investigations, prove paranormal activity.

The Sloss Furnace has a bloody history with paranormal activity. That makes the Furnace one of Alabama's most haunted locations in America.

Sources: 

https://frightfurnace.com/hauntings/haunted-history-of-sloss-furnace/

https://www.travelchannel.com/shows/ghost-adventures/articles/sloss-furnaces-haunted-history

 

Category/Genre(s): Horror, Paranormal
Updated: Every Other Week
Status: Ongoing









Series Description:

Alabama's Sloss Furnace

I love things that go bump in the night. Haunted locations complete with paranormal happenings. I'm currently working on a weekly series about America's Cryptids. 

This series will be one about Haunted America. I'm starting this series off with an Alabama haunted story.

One of the most documented haunted locations in Alabama is Sloss Furnace. Investigated numerous times, Sloss Furnace is a lode of paranormal activity.

Jones Valley, Alabama, has rich resources. The primary resource is the ability to make Iron. All the ingredients were in a 30-mile radius and a rich ore inside the Red Mountain. Hidden in the rich Alabama earth is coal deposits, while limestone, dolomite, and clay. 

 Colonel James Withers Sloss helped create Birmingham in 1876. Along with other business people's help, built Sloss furnace to take advantage of Jones Valley's rich mineral resources. 

From 1882 to 1971, Sloss Furnaces transformed the raw minerals into hardened steel. Steel that was part of the industrial revolution and went into creating New York. The tall skyscraper's that glisten like diamonds in the evening light. 

Sloss furnace grew and prospered during World War II. Its steel went into building ships and tanks supporting the war effort. 

So, why is the Sloss Furnace haunted? 

Stories tell of a foreman, James “Slag” Wormwood. In the early 1900s, Wormwood was foreman of the “Graveyard Shift." That time between sunset and sunrise. He had a crew of 150 workers he forced to keep the Furnace running.

Wormwood was a cruel boss. Alabama's summers are hot and humid, with temperatures soaring to more than 120 degrees. Intense stifling heat, lack of sleep, and poor working conditions made working in the Furnace Hell.

The furnace workers were undocumented immigrants looking for a better way of life. Instead, they found themselves working in unbearable conditions. The fierce heat and cramped quarters, creating intolerable conditions. The workers had only a moment's notice before Wormwood could force them back to work. 

Wormwood forced his poor workers to take dangerous risks to increase production. The time of his leadership, Wormwood lost 47 men. He had ten times more deaths than any other shift at the Furnace. Not only did Wormwood have more deaths on his shift? He also had more accidents. There was even an explosion at the Furnace in which six workers lost their sight.

These poor people had time off - not even the holidays. They had only the Furnace with its back-breaking work.

In October of 1906, Wormwood fell into a pool of melted iron ore. He instantly melted into nothingness. Rumor is that Wormwood slipped from the top of Big Alice. The top of the highest furnace blast at Sloss furnace. There are a few others that believed that the abused workers finally had enough. If the workers did kill Wormwood, there were no charges against them.

Soon after the 'accident,' strange happenings began at the Furnace. Steel production began to drop on that shift, and they stopped the GraveYard shift. It didn't help that the already over-worked men had accidents. They even reported strange and unusual occurrences happening at the Furnace.

News of Sloss Furnace being haunted increased. Workers claimed that they 'felt' his unnatural presence. A night watchman reported an angry voice ordered him back to work. He was pushed from behind resulting in serious injuries.

In 1947, three supervisors went missing. After an extensive search, the three men were found unconscious. They didn't remember much of the attack. Only that a badly burned man approached them and shouted at them “to push some steel.”

The most terrifying incident happened right before the plant closed permanently. They were locking all the secrets and abuse suffered inside behind steel doors. The last night, Samuel Blumenthal, a Sloss Night Watchman, took one last look around. He discovered memories, but not about the plant.

Turning around to leave, he found himself face to face with a “half-man/half-demon.” The creature tried to push him up the stairs, and Blumenthal fought him. The monster, not liking Blumenthal's response, beat him up. Dr. Jack Barlo examined Blumenthal after his horrifying night. Intense burns covered his body, and he died to never return to Sloss.

Since the Furnace's closer in 1971, there have been over 100 reports of paranormal happenings. Anywhere from steam whistles blowing to the rare physical attacks. The majority of the stories are in September and October at night. During the graveyard shift. Coincidence?

September and October immediately bring to mind Halloween pranks. Yet, over 100 reports in thirty years are a lot for mere tricks. 

The history of the Sloss furnace and the unusual paranormal activity gained the attention of investigators. Numerous paranormal investigators wanted a chance to see if the Furnace was haunted.

In 1988, the Center for Paranormal Events (CPE) in St. Petersburg, Florida, investigated Sloss Furnaces. There was no paranormal evidence gathered during the investigation. However, team members felt that the lack of humanity shown to his workers left behind numerous restless souls.

Sloss was investigated again by Fox’s Scariest Places. Their paranormal team stated the site had the highest level of metaphysical energy ever encountered. 

The CBS Affiliate WJTV investigated the site, and this time they captured investigation footage. The Alabama Foundation for Paranormal Research stated they doubted that Sloss is a hotspot of paranormal activity.  

Then on October 4, 2003, a worker from Sloss, Josh Thomas, was assaulted. It was reported Thomas caught fire after seeing a strange figure. Thomas suffered burns up and down his body, but he couldn't remember what happened.

Two psychic investigators from the TV show AIRLINE, Investigated Sloss Furnaces. During the filming, an investigator bled from a cut on his right hand. The camera filmed images of spirits on their cameras. 

The Unexplained Mystery investigation team investigated Sloss. The team captured shadows on film. In 2012, Ghost Adventures-visited, and members were physically assaulted — again, caught on film.

An investigative team from TAPS (Ghost Hunters) visited Sloss Furnace. They captured terrific footage. That evidence, plus the evidence from other investigations, prove paranormal activity.

The Sloss Furnace has a bloody history with paranormal activity. That makes the Furnace one of Alabama's most haunted locations in America.

Sources: 

https://frightfurnace.com/hauntings/haunted-history-of-sloss-furnace/

https://www.travelchannel.com/shows/ghost-adventures/articles/sloss-furnaces-haunted-history

 

Category/Genre(s): Horror, Paranormal
Updated: Every Other Week
Status: Ongoing