CHANNILLO

Welcome to Channillo!

Already have an account? Log In













*Memberships start at $4.99/month and let you to subscribe to series.

By signing up you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

Maybe Later

Daily Poetry Changes Lives
By Christopher Burn

Series Description:

Every day in every year, something happens, however small.  Less often, world-changing moments like the Battle of Waterloo come along.  But whatever has happened, history is nothing if we do not learn from it.

How we view the past is largely a matter of choice; for some, historic fact and accuracy is everything. For me, the poetic way has always been preferable. Despite the almost inevitable distortions that poetic licence brings, the inspiration that poetry provides has always made up for that.  I would never have bothered with the Hundred Years War if I had not read Shakespeare’s Henry V.

A book like this brings a touch of discipline and routine into the day. We might need to remind ourselves what day of the month it is anyway, but linking the date to an actual past event adds, I hope, a little extra spice. We open our minds to visualise the named event and we may then like to contemplate the poem that follows which is, however tenuously, linked in some way. Hopefully the poem brings colour and inspiration to what might otherwise be a mere statement of facts. Having received the information for the day and visualised, with the help of a poem, its emotional aspects, we then have the chance to ponder its relevance to ourselves, through the concluding lines of reflection. Thus the battle of Waterloo is described as an event, given colour by Byron’s famous poem ‘The Eve of Waterloo’, and related to ourselves with the reminder that a spiritual dimension can help us deal with life’s great problems.

Follow Chris on Twitter @LivesPoetry

 

Category: Journal Entries
Updated: Daily
Status: Completed



Author Bio For Christopher Burn:

About the Author


Christopher Burn studied classics before training as a chartered accountant.  As well as a career in finance that took him around Europe, he has been at various times a charity worker, hotelier, freelance journalist and cab driver. He now works as a psychotherapist in the field of addiction. Christopher is married with three children and five grandchildren and divides his time between Scotland and London.  He says:

‘My book combines my two great interests of history and poetry with a desire for self-improvement that for many years was notably lacking in my life.  I believe that we can apply the lessons of history and the inspiration of poetry to help us take small daily steps towards becoming better persons. Thus for example, the battle of Agincourt in 1415 is brought alive by reading Shakespeare’s wonderful play Henry V, which leads us to contemplate the futility of war and the need for wiser actions. What a great way to start each day!’

Favourite quote at present:

“History says, don't hope

On this side of the grave.

But then, once in a lifetime

The longed-for tidal wave

Of justice can rise up,

And hope and history rhyme.” (Seamus Heaney – The Cure at Troy)

Daily Poetry Changes Lives will be published as a book at a future date.

Acknowledgements:

Stephanie Wolfe Murray edited these pages, her help was invaluable. Rupert Wolfe Murray and Manuela Boghian give me continuing unfailing help and support. Mark Baldwin advises me without complaint.  Ingrid Christie helps me on design matters. Margie, Alex, Johnnie and Annabel Burn give me endless ideas and support. How lucky can I be?

Notes:

All ideas and opinions are solely those of the author and are not intended to give offence.

References:

All quotations  and references are believed to consist of material that is in the public domain and therefore not subject to copyright law.







Series Description:

Every day in every year, something happens, however small.  Less often, world-changing moments like the Battle of Waterloo come along.  But whatever has happened, history is nothing if we do not learn from it.

How we view the past is largely a matter of choice; for some, historic fact and accuracy is everything. For me, the poetic way has always been preferable. Despite the almost inevitable distortions that poetic licence brings, the inspiration that poetry provides has always made up for that.  I would never have bothered with the Hundred Years War if I had not read Shakespeare’s Henry V.

A book like this brings a touch of discipline and routine into the day. We might need to remind ourselves what day of the month it is anyway, but linking the date to an actual past event adds, I hope, a little extra spice. We open our minds to visualise the named event and we may then like to contemplate the poem that follows which is, however tenuously, linked in some way. Hopefully the poem brings colour and inspiration to what might otherwise be a mere statement of facts. Having received the information for the day and visualised, with the help of a poem, its emotional aspects, we then have the chance to ponder its relevance to ourselves, through the concluding lines of reflection. Thus the battle of Waterloo is described as an event, given colour by Byron’s famous poem ‘The Eve of Waterloo’, and related to ourselves with the reminder that a spiritual dimension can help us deal with life’s great problems.

Follow Chris on Twitter @LivesPoetry

 

Category: Journal Entries
Updated: Daily
Status: Completed


Author Bio For Christopher Burn:

About the Author


Christopher Burn studied classics before training as a chartered accountant.  As well as a career in finance that took him around Europe, he has been at various times a charity worker, hotelier, freelance journalist and cab driver. He now works as a psychotherapist in the field of addiction. Christopher is married with three children and five grandchildren and divides his time between Scotland and London.  He says:

‘My book combines my two great interests of history and poetry with a desire for self-improvement that for many years was notably lacking in my life.  I believe that we can apply the lessons of history and the inspiration of poetry to help us take small daily steps towards becoming better persons. Thus for example, the battle of Agincourt in 1415 is brought alive by reading Shakespeare’s wonderful play Henry V, which leads us to contemplate the futility of war and the need for wiser actions. What a great way to start each day!’

Favourite quote at present:

“History says, don't hope

On this side of the grave.

But then, once in a lifetime

The longed-for tidal wave

Of justice can rise up,

And hope and history rhyme.” (Seamus Heaney – The Cure at Troy)

Daily Poetry Changes Lives will be published as a book at a future date.

Acknowledgements:

Stephanie Wolfe Murray edited these pages, her help was invaluable. Rupert Wolfe Murray and Manuela Boghian give me continuing unfailing help and support. Mark Baldwin advises me without complaint.  Ingrid Christie helps me on design matters. Margie, Alex, Johnnie and Annabel Burn give me endless ideas and support. How lucky can I be?

Notes:

All ideas and opinions are solely those of the author and are not intended to give offence.

References:

All quotations  and references are believed to consist of material that is in the public domain and therefore not subject to copyright law.